Rosetta Fire track features on Britpop compilation

A Warwickshire band have had their track featured on a brand new compilation celebrating the Britpop era, 20 years on from when the likes of Oasis, Blur and Suede ruled our airwaves and our CD collections.

Jimmy Lapworth, of Warwick band Rosetta Fire, is one of just ten artists to feature on the ‘Shine (Again)’ compilation of covers of classic Britpop tracks, which has been compiled by God Is In The TV (www.godisinthetv.co.uk), one of the UK’s most popular music and culture zines.

shineagain-300x300Jimmy, guitarist and vocalist for Rosetta Fire – who headline this Saturday’s Night of the Musicians at The Wild Boar in Warwick – has his interpretation of the Stone Roses classic, Love Spreads, featured on the compilation, which is available to listen to online here: http://www.godisinthetvzine.co.uk/2014/04/08/stream-shine-again-a-compilation-of-covers-of-british-pop-songs-from-the-1990s-side-a

Other famous Britpop era acts to be covered by independent and unsigned bands and artists on the compilation include Sleeper, Edwyn Collins, Kenickie, Baby Bird and Shed Seven.

Rosetta Fire are the only Midlands band to be represented on the God Is In The TV compilation. Its release comes just days after the BBC’s celebration of ‘Britpop at the BBC’ last week with a series of special programmes across TV and radio.

Bill Cummings, Editor of God Is In The TV, decided to pull together the Britpop compilation as “both a celebration and a reappraisal of the wave of new British music that was just making its mark 20 years ago this year”,after running a ‘Britpop month’ in February.

Jimmy Lapworth 1“Being a thirty-something, Britpop was the dominant musical force in my formative years,” says Jimmy Lapworth. “At the time it seemed like Britpop ruled the world, whereas in reality it ruled London, Liverpool and Manchester.

“Retrospect is a wonderful thing and we now realise that for the most part it was a music industry fallacy that was nowhere near as clever as it thought it was (much like the 90s in general). However, there were a few genuine moments of cultural importance that leave us with musical and artistic hangovers to this day.”

Asked why he decided to cover The Stone Roses, Jimmy says: “Ever since I first picked up on The Stone Roses in 1997 I’ve been a huge fan. There’s just something menacing but cool about that song. The heavy guitars mixed with that insistent groove from the drums and bass and Ian (Brown)’s almost whispered delivery. It’s a perfect record of where the band were at when they were recording the album; John Squire going off on his own tangent and the other three reigning him in to that Roses sound.

“All of this and it’s just a fantastic song musically that dares to portray Jesus as a black woman. There you have the classic Roses paradox – they challenged organised religion only to build up an almost religious fan base themselves.”

Asked whether he thinks we’ll see another Britpop era, Jimmy says: “The way those acts paved the way for future bands is still with us in one form or another. And the fact a some of them still tour shows that having created the monster, the music industry and the public don’t know how to let it go. But will we see another Britpop? Probably not. Do we need to? No. Let it live where it belongs. Forever. In 1994.”

Rosetta Fire posed full band

Upcoming dates for the band include:

Saturday 19 April: Whitefriars Festival, Whitefriars Ale House, Coventry (acoustic trio)

Sunday 4 May: Whitefriars Ale House, Coventry

Thursday 8 May: Café vin Cinq Acoustic Night, Rugby (featured artist, acoustic trio)

Tuesday 20 May: Zephyr Lounge, Leamington (full band with Shanade & Bunsen Honey)

Friday 1 August: The Windmill, Coventry (acoustic trio)

Wednesday 6 August: The Bedford, Balham, London (full band)

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